Category: Fail Tracker

Source Code for “Build Your Own Application Framework” Course Online

If you do a quick Google for Fail Tracker, the sample project I used in my Pluralsight course, you will end up at a Github project page for Fail Tracker that I set up back in 2011.  That’s when I first used “Fail Tracker” in a demo (at CodeStock!), and until today, it has hosted…

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Data Access in Fail Tracker–Row-Level Security with LINQ to NHibernate

This is the third and probably final post about how data access is performed in Fail Tracker.  I’ve previously shown you the basics of how its repository-pattern based approach and how a shared base SpecsFor test fixture is leveraged to simplify testing.  In this post, I’ll show you how the decorator pattern is employed to…

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Data Access in Fail Tracker–Unit Testing

In my last post, I described Fail Tracker’s simple repository model for abstracting LINQ to NHibernate, which is used for all data access in Fail Tracker.  One reason I chose to implement an abstraction around NHibernate’s ISession interface was to facilitate Test Driven Development, a practice that wasn’t really feasible given how LINQ to NHibernate…

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Data Access in Fail Tracker

This is going to be the first in a series of short posts on how data access is handled in Fail Tracker.  Future posts will get into how the strategy works with unit testing as well as how advanced topics, such as row-level security, are handled.  Read on to find out how Fail Tracker utilizes…

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Cleaning up POSTs in ASP.NET MVC, the Fail Tracker Way

Those who have worked with ASP.NET MVC for more than a day have no doubt found themselves repeating common patterns when handling POSTs.  Jimmy Bogard recently blogged one way to simplify your actions.  I handled the same problem in Fail Tracker by implementing a very simple convention (one-model-in, one-model-out) and pushing some responsibility into the…

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Building Nice Display Names From Pascal-Case View Model Names in ASP.NET MVC 3

One of my goals with Fail Tracker is to push the “Convention over Configuration” idea as far as you possibly can within the confines of ASP.NET MVC.  I’m obviously biased, but so far I think I’ve been quite successful, and Fail Tracker is probably the most enjoyable codebase I’ve ever worked with.  One convention I…

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